Start-up costs

I was talking to the parent of a prospective student today, and we got to discussing the initial costs of taking violin lessons. There is a lot to consider, so I’ll try to break it down in this post.

First and foremost, obviously, you’ll need a violin. Price on a violin can range from $350 to many thousands of dollars. For a beginner, though, an entry-level violin will be around $350 for child sizes up to around $700-$800 for a good-quality adult violin. I am aware that cheaper violins are available on amazon and other online stores, but I’ve not included them in the price range here because I do not recommend them. The quality just isn’t there, and keep in mind that you’ll be listening to this instrument for hours and hours of practice. Also, when you buy a better-quality violin, you have a better potential for resale when your child outgrows her instrument.

Next of course, a bow, which can be fibreglass or wood. $100-$150 for a good-quality child-size bow, up to $300 or more for an adult size.

Accessories: A hard case to transport and store your instrument. Rosin for your bow. A shoulder rest (see my note on this below*). A spare set of strings. A music stand. A metronome, while not a necessity right away, will be very helpful as you get a little more experience and need to work on tempo. All together, you’re looking at probably another $200-$250.

Finally, if you’re taking lessons at Studio Kingma 2.0, you’ll need a copy of the Suzuki violin method, book 1. This is where we will begin. It contains tons of information on technique as well as most of the music repertoire we’ll be playing for the first year. It also comes with a CD recording of the music, which is especially helpful when we’re starting out and not yet proficient at reading music. Cost is around $30.

When you come for your first lesson, you’ll also get an exercise book in which we’ll track your progress from week to week. You will also likely get fingering tape, applied to the neck of your violin, to help you learn proper finger positioning for pitch. You may also get a loan of a bow-stopper or bowing hand positioning aids, if I feel it will help you progress. Finally, for young kids, I have a book of worksheets to help with music-reading with fun activities and games.

Now you’re all set! Time to start playing!

*Just a quick note on shoulder rests: I am not a fan of rigid shoulder rests. They do not allow for proper movement when playing the violin and I do not allow my students to use them during lessons. A soft, sponge-type shoulder rest is recommended. A special type of sponge that has some grip is available from most violin supply stores and can be held on the violin with a simple elastic. This is ideal for kids. For more advanced violinists, my personal recommendation is the Acousta-grip. While expensive, it is the best shoulder rest product I have found. I am able to source these for my students who are interested, since not all violin stores carry them.

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